TITLE

COMMENTARY: Rate control was more cost-effective than rhythm control in persistent atrial fibrillation

AUTHOR(S)
Newman, David
PUB. DATE
March 2005
SOURCE
ACP Journal Club;Mar/Apr2005, Vol. 142 Issue 2, p53
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article comments on a study which examines the cost-effectiveness of rate control over rhythm control for reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation. The study did not identify a strategy-dependent difference in efficacy outcomes between patients randomized to receive efforts to maintain sinus rhythm or continue with rate control. This negative result was also seen in the 4000-patient Atrial Fibrillation Follow-Up Investigation of Rhythm Management Study.
ACCESSION #
16486605

 

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