TITLE

THROMBOTIC, ATHEROSCLEROTIC AND LIPEMIC EFFECTS OF DIETARY FATS IN THE RAT

AUTHOR(S)
Renaud, Serge
PUB. DATE
December 1969
SOURCE
Angiology;Dec1969, Vol. 20 Issue 11, p657
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Among the more common saturated fatty acids, palmitic acid appears to be the most hyperlipemic when added to the basic high-fat diet of rats. Under these conditions, stearic and especially lauric acid seem to have much less effect on both the cholesterol and triglyceride serum levels. However, the rats fed the long-chain fatty acids, palmitic and mostly stearic acids, presented the most severe pblebothromboses, initiated in these rats by the intravenous injection of a S. typhosa endotoxin and resulting in multiple red hepatic infarcts. Fats richer in stearic acid, such as cacao butter and butter, are also much more thrombogenic than lard and corn oil, which contain less stearic acid and much more linoleic acid, probably an antithrombogenic fatty acid. Among a large number of fats fed to rats under comparable conditions, the results obtained were not as clear because butter was the most thrombogenic and olive oil and bovine tallow, despite a high content in stearic acid, the least thrombogenic. The low thrombogenicity of these latter fats, despite a marked hyperlipemic effect, is probably due to their high oleic acid content. However, the thrombogenicity of a fat is probably the result of multiple fatty acid interactions and should be further analyzed. Only with a limited number of fats could the lipemia or the plasma clotting time be utilized to predict the thrombotic tendency of the animals. But in large-scale experiments, serum cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as the plasma clotting time, could be considered merely as risk factors. In contrast to this, there was a highly significant correlation between the survival time of the endotoxin-treated animals and their serum triglyceride level. The effects of a few selected fats on the production of aortic fatty streaks in the rat seem to be related to the thrombogenic effect and also to the composition in fatty acids. Under the conditions of this study, neither the degree of saturation of a fat nor its origin (animal, vegetable) appears to be of any use for predicting its lipemic, thrombogenic or atherogenic effects.
ACCESSION #
16441634

 

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