TITLE

AT&T's Obituary -- How Many Feet Can You Shoot Yourself In?

AUTHOR(S)
Finneran, Michael
PUB. DATE
March 2005
SOURCE
Business Communications Review;Mar2005, Vol. 35 Issue 3, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on AT&T Corp. In its early days, AT&T was an aggressive, bare-knuckles competitor whose business practices would have made Microsoft's tactics look like a Girl Scout cookie drive. AT&T forced small competitors to sell out to them by refusing to connect them to the long distance network. However, by the 1960s, AT&T had become an institution, and institutions are a problem. With the advent of the computer age, AT&T determined that they had to be a computer company, rather than succeed at what they were good at. AT&T had hoped to pay off its $65 billion in cable acquisition debt with those long distance profits. The AT&T upper-echelon who drove the plane into the mountain will be well provided for, and we can only wish good luck to the good and dedicated people whose careers will be uprooted with this final collapsen.
ACCESSION #
16429457

 

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