TITLE

LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF FUROSEMIDE AND HYDROCHLOROTHIAZIDE IN PATIENTS WITH ESSENTIAL HYPERTENSION

AUTHOR(S)
Finnerty, Frank A.; Maxwell, Morton H.; Lunn, John; Moser, Marvin
PUB. DATE
February 1977
SOURCE
Angiology;Feb1977, Vol. 28 Issue 2, p125
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In a double-blind study the long-term effects of diuretics in uncomplicated mild and moderate essential hypertension were investigated. A total of 52 outpatients completed 24 months of treatment with either furosemide at a dose of 40 mg twice daily (26 patients) or hydrochlorothiazide at a dose of 50 mg twice daily (26 patients). Throughout the 2 years of the study, both furosemide and hydrochlorothiazide significantly lowered the mean supine blood pressure from baseline levels. The fall was less with furosemide than with hydrochlorothiazide, although the difference between the two drugs reached statistical significance at only three of the eight time points. Serum electrolytes were used as major indicators of safety. The cumulative incidence of hypokalemia of 8% for the furosemide group compared to that of 62% for the hydrochlorothiazide group. Although diuretics, alone or combined with other blood pressure-lowering drugs, have been used for many years to treat essential hypertension, information on their continued efficacy and safety is scarce. Short-term trials had shown that furosemide (Lasix®) resembled the thiazides in its antihypertensive properties, despite its different mode of action on the kidney. A cooperative study in hypertensive patients was therefore undertaken at three clinical centers to investigate the long-term effects of furosemide on blood pressure and on serum electrolytes, and to compare them with those of hydrochlorothiazide.
ACCESSION #
16400786

 

Related Articles

  • CURRENT DRUG THERAPY IN HYPERTENSION. Brest, Albert N.; Moyer, John H. // Angiology;Feb1963, Vol. 14 Issue 2, p64 

    At present, diastolic hypertension can be controlled in the overwhelming majority of instances. However a double- or triple-drug regimen may be required in patients with moderate or severe diastolic blood pressure elevation.

  • FUROSEMIDE AND PLASMA RENIN ACTIVITY IN ESSENTIAL HYPERTENSION. Hutcheon, Duncan E.; Sandhu, Randhir // Angiology;Oct1976, Vol. 27 Issue 10, p579 

    Changes in arterial blood pressure, renal electrolyte excretion, and plasma renin activity in response to repeated doses of furosemide were measured in 12 patients with essential hypertension admitted to the medical service for electrolyte balance studies. Eighty and 120 mg/day furosemide in...

  • Conversion from 2.5 mg to 1.25 mg Indapamide in Patients with Mild to Moderate Hypertension. Levine, Barton; Lee, William; Boyd, Gary; Chrysant, Steven; Dawson, Jack; Gardner, Timothy; Hill, Gregory; Vergis, James; Codispoti, Joseph; Stokes, Arthur; McNally, Charles // Journal of Family Practice;Jul1995, Vol. 41 Issue 1, p75 

    Background. Indapamide is an effective antihypertensive drug with diuretic and vasodilating activities. The common starting dose has been 2.5 mg to 5 mg. A lower dose formulation (1.25 mg) is now available. The safety and efficacy of switching patients from indapamide 2.5 mg to indapamide 1.25...

  • Understanding refractory hypertension. Ram, C. Venkata S. // Patient Care for the Nurse Practitioner;May2004, Vol. 7 Issue 5, p9 

    The article offers information on refractory hypertension. Hypertension is usually considered refractory if blood pressure (BP) cannot be reduced below target levels in patients who are compliant with an optimal triple-drug regimen that includes a diuretic. Rational management of refractory...

  • Diuretics 'have no place' as first-line therapy in high BP. Praities, Nigel // Pulse;6/17/2009, Vol. 69 Issue 21, p3 

    The article provides an analysis on the research concerning hypertension presented at the European Meeting on Hypertension in Milan, Italy in which findings have shown that diuretics were consistently inferior to other antihypertensive treatments to control ambulatory blood pressure (BP) for 24...

  • Review: Lower-dose combination antihypertensive therapy is preferable to standard-dose single-drug therapy: COMMENTARY. Linden, Wolfgang // ACP Journal Club;Jan/Feb2004, Vol. 140 Issue 1, p4 

    This article focuses on a study related to value of low dose combination treatment with blood pressure-lowering drugs, published in the 2003 issue of "British Medical Journal." The valuable and well-researched study investigates the effectiveness of the 5 most frequently used drugs for...

  • Prostaglandins and Hypertension. Barger, A. Clifford // Angiology;Apr1978, Vol. 29 Issue 4, p320 

    Evidence is presented demonstrating the role of prostaglandins in salt metabolism and on peripheral vasodilation. A number of animal studies and observations in buman bypertensive subjects suggest that the prostaglandin system plays a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. The most striking...

  • Advantages and Disadvantages of Beta- Adrenergic Blocking Drugs in Hypertension. O'Brien, Eoin T. // Angiology;Apr1978, Vol. 29 Issue 4, p332 

    This paper reviews the role of beta-adrenergic blocking drugs in the treatment of hypertension. A significant proportion of patients presenting with mild or moderate hypertension will respond to general measures and do not require specific drug therapy. Of the remaining patients, some will...

  • Is it a go for prehypertension treatment?  // Cortlandt Forum;May2006, Vol. 19 Issue 5, p9 

    This article reports that according to a new study, pharmacologic treatment of prehypertension may prevent or postpone the onset of hypertension. Cardiologists randomized 772 people suffering from prehypertension to either placebo or the angiotensin receptor blocker candesartan. After two years,...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics