TITLE

THE RATIONAL USE OF VASODILATING AGENTS IN CHRONIC PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL AND ARTERIOLAR VASCULAR DISORDERS

AUTHOR(S)
Sherber, Daniel A.
PUB. DATE
January 1963
SOURCE
Angiology;Jan1963, Vol. 14 Issue 1, p55
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Review of the pharmacology of vasodilating drugs would indicate that the most effective agents would be those acting directly on the smooth muscle of the blood vessels. This is so because such action is spasmolytic in character and in therapeutic doses does not block reflex vasomotor activity. Theoretically, such drugs should be free of any vascular side effects. A 5-year experience with cyclandelate (Cyclospasmol) bears this out. Of 137 patients with peripheral vascular disease treated with this drug, 80 per cent or 104 patients obtained good to moderate relief of their peripheral arterial insufficiency. Three women with Raynaud's disease had good to moderate response, and three out of four patients with thromboangiitis obliterans had a similar reaction. The dose used for 132 patients was 800 mg per day in divided dose. Our experience would indicate that patients who do not respond to 1600 mg per day will not react to larger doses. In no instances were any untoward effects of the drug noted even after 5 years. Treatment failure was most frequent in the oldest age group and in those patients with the longest history of vascular insufficiency. This would indicate that successful drug therapy is possible only when there are sufficient vessels capable of responding.
ACCESSION #
16395551

 

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