TITLE

PITFALLS IN ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY FOR MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

AUTHOR(S)
Moore, Charles B.
PUB. DATE
January 1964
SOURCE
Angiology;Jan1964, Vol. 15 Issue 1, p27
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The additional evidence to the growing belief that prolonged oral anticoagulant therapy is safe and practical also requires a discussion of the pitfalls in the management of these patients which includes: 1. Difficulties with laboratory determinations and their inability at times to reflect the state of anticoagulation of the various blood clotting factors, as well as the fact that there is no general agreement from one laboratory' to another concerning a given prothrombin time determination. 2. Chronic elevations of serum glutamic oxatacetic and glutamic pyruvic transaminase levels secondary to oral administration of anticoagulants in the absence of chronic hepatic disease. 3. Fluctuations in the daily oral dose of anticoagulant required, secondary lo many factors, with exposure to organic solvents, changes in the weather, and "lost week ends" being the most prevalent. 4. Psychologic problems secondary to development of dependency states and the constant reminders of debility that oral use of anticoagulants imply. 5. The human factors related to the difficulty in taking daily medications without fail, particularly when there is great physical fear of the consequences if the dose is missed or an extra dose taken. 6. The tendency to overtreatment of bleeding episodes with vitamin K.
ACCESSION #
16372442

 

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