TITLE

VASCULAR REACTIONS IN ACROCYANOSIS

AUTHOR(S)
Sivula, Arto
PUB. DATE
May 1966
SOURCE
Angiology;May1966, Vol. 17 Issue 5, p269
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Observations and experiments were made on three persons with severe acrocyanosis to study the vascular reactions in the affected parts. All the symptoms of acrocyanosis disappeared when the hands were raised and the venous hydrostatic pressure was eliminated. The fingertip temperatures showed that when the hands were raised the vasoconstriction rapidly turned to vasodilation. The noradrenaline test, in which noradrenaline was administered by intravenous infusion, showed a propensity for arteriolar dilation when the subjects were lying down with the arms in horizontal position. The standardized cold test by Heidelmann also indicated a tendency to dilate in finger arterioles when the limbs were raised, but the type of reaction was that of vasoconstriction when the arms were hanging down. The observations indicate that the primary disturbance in acrocyanosis is not on the arterial side but on the venous side. There must be a defect in the venules and venous plexuses to compensate the increased venous pressure when the arms are hanging down. The arteriolar constriction might be only a secondary phenomenon induced by a vascular reflex.
ACCESSION #
16369505

 

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