TITLE

A NEW BASE LINE FOR THE EVALUATION OF ANTIHYPERTENSIVES

AUTHOR(S)
Grenfell, Raymond F.; Briggs, Arthur H.; Holland, William C.
PUB. DATE
November 1962
SOURCE
Angiology;Nov1962, Vol. 13 Issue 11, p495
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In the parenteral placebo group, there was a significant decrease in the systolic blood pressure for 63 weeks and in the diastolic blood pressure for 147 weeks when compared to the blood pressure in week 0 of treatment. There was a significant decrease in the systolic blood pressure in these patients receiving the hydrogenated alkaloids of ergot parenterally for 55 weeks and in the diastolic blood pressure for 159 weeks when compared to the blood pressure of week 0 of treatment. However, there was no difference when the blood pressure readings of the groups receiving placebo parenterally were compared to the blood pressure readings of the group being given drug parenterally. The administration of an oral placebo did not cause any significant decrease in the systolic or diastolic blood pressure. The hydrogenated alkaloids of ergot, when given orally, caused a statistically significant persistent decrease in the systolic and diastolic blood pressure when compared to the blond pressure of week 0. However, there was no significant difference when the blood pressure was compared to the blood pressure obtained with the oral placebo except in week 7 in systolic blood pressure and week 12 in diastolic blood pressure. Dihydroergocornine caused no significant decrease in systolic or diastolic blood pressure when compared to the blood pressure of week 0 or to the blood pressures obtained with oral placebo. Reserpine orally caused a significant decrease in the systolic and diastolic blood pressure when compared to that of week 0. There was no significant difference between the blood pressure obtained with reserpine and that obtained with placebo except in week 4 in the diastolic blood pressure. In comparison to the blood pressure of week 0, there was a significant decrease in the systolic blood pressure in all weeks except the first week and in the diastolic blood pressure in all weeks when the combination capsule of rauwolfia, protoveratrine and phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride was given. When the blood pressure readings were compared to those of the oral placebo, there was no significant difference except in weeks 7, 9, 10 and 11 in the systolic blood pressure. In the diastolic blond pressure, however, there was a significant difference in all weeks except weeks 1 and 2. The systolic blood pressure was significantly lower in all weeks compared to the blood pressure of week 0 in the group receiving thioridazine. The diastolic blood pressure was lower than week 0 only in weeks 6 and 7. In comparison to the blood pressure of the oral placebo group, none of the readings of the systolic blood pressure was lower and only in week 1 was the diastolic blood pressure lower. Phenobarbital caused a significant decrease in the systolic and diastolic blood pressure only in weeks 4 and 10 when compared to the blood pressure of week 0. There was no difference in diastolic and diastolic blood pressure when compared to the blood pressure obtained with oral placebo. Isocarboxazid administration was followed by a significant decrease in the systolic blood pressure in all weeks except weeks 1 and 2 and in the diastolic blood pressure in all weeks except week 1 when compared to the blood pressure of week 0. There was a significant decrease in the systolic blood pressure only in week 3 and in the diastolic blood pressure only in week 1 when compared in the blood pressure of the oral placebo group. This study has provided a base line which permits the accurate evaluation, under controlled conditions, of both oral and parenteral drugs in the area of hypertension. Additional agents are being evaluated on a short-term basis. The effect of simple decrease of blood pressure on a long term basis with respect to complications and longevity will be studied. Changes in eyegrounds, renal function, and cardiac size, will be available for future information.
ACCESSION #
16369283

 

Related Articles

  • Millions of mild hypertensives.  // British Medical Journal;10/18/1980, Vol. 281 Issue 6247, p1024 

    Examines the treatment for mild hypertensive in Great Britain. Management of blood pressure levels; Cautions on the fatal and non-fatal complications; Efficacy of drugs as treatment.

  • Antihypertensive agent.  // Geriatrics;Apr97, Vol. 52 Issue 4, p36 

    Presents information about valsatran (Diovan), an angiotensin II receptor blocker which has been approved for the treatment of hypertension. Similarity of valsatran in placebo; Recommended dosage for taking valsatran; Occurrence of antihypertensive effect; Adverse reactions of valsatran.

  • The value of 24-h blood pressure monitoring to assess the efficacy of antihypertensive drug treatment. O'Brien, Eoin // Hot Topics in Hypertension;2011, Vol. 4 Issue 12, p7 

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in pharmacological trials has evolved over the years. It is now evident that its advantages greatly outweigh the limitations arising from BP measurements taken in the clinic. While early studies of antihypertensive drugs were restricted by the need for...

  • Association between prescription burden and medication adherence in patients initiating antihypertensive and lipid-lowering therapy. Benner, Joshua S.; Chapman, Richard H.; Petrilla, Allison A.; Tang, Simon S. K.; Rosenberg, Noah; Schwartz, J. Sanford // American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy;8/15/2009, Vol. 66 Issue 16, p1471 

    Purpose. The association between prescription burden and medication adherence in patients initiating antihypertensive and lipid-lowering therapy was studied. Methods. Patients enrolled in managed care organizations who initiated antihypertensive therapy coincident with lipid-lowering therapy (no...

  • Efficacy and sustainability of 24-h blood pressure control: focus on olmesartan-driven products. Verdecchia, Paolo // Hot Topics in Hypertension;2011, Vol. 4 Issue 12, p25 

    Effective and sustained control of blood pressure (BP) is crucial in preventing organ damage and cardiovascular (CV) complications from hypertension. However, only a minority of treated patients with hypertension achieve adequate BP control. This picture is complicated by the inherent...

  • Randomised controlled trial of treatment for mild hypertension: design and pilot trial.  // British Medical Journal;6/4/77, Vol. 1 Issue 6074, p1437 

    Presents a design and pilot trial for treating mild and moderate hypertension. Efficacy of drug treatment for hypertension; Determination on the effect of antihypertensive treatment in adults of either sex; Benefits of antihypertensive treatment.

  • Increasing the Dietary Potassium Intake Reduces the Need for Antihypertensive Medication.  // Annals of Internal Medicine;11/15/91, Vol. 115 Issue 10, p753 

    Presents a study which determined whether an increase in dietary potassium intake from natural foods reduces the need for antihypertensive medication in patients with essential hypertension. Methods; Drug therapy protocols; Results; Discussion; Conclusion.

  • More physicians favoring newer antihypertensives: Is there good reason?  // Geriatrics;Jun95, Vol. 50 Issue 6, p20 

    Reports on the trend towards the use of newer antihypertensives by physicians in the United States. Decrease in prescription of diuretics; Increase in prescriptions for calcium channel blockers; Effectivity.

  • UK supply must be restored. Turtle, Emma J.; Webb, David J.; Morrison, Emma E. // BMJ: British Medical Journal;5/18/2013, Vol. 346 Issue 7908, p23 

    A letter to the editor is presented in response to the article "Hypertension: clinical management of primary hypertension in adults," by National Institute for Health and Care Evidence in the 2011 issue.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics