TITLE

EFFECT OF SUBLINGUAL HEPARIN ON LIPEMIA CLEARING AND ON RECURRENCE OF MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

AUTHOR(S)
Fuller, Harvey L.
PUB. DATE
June 1960
SOURCE
Angiology;Jun1960 Part 1, Vol. 11 Issue 3, p200
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Repeated experiments establish the ability of heparin, given sublingually, to reduce the degree of serum lipemia after a standard fat meal. In a controlled clinical study of 260 post-coronary patients, one-half were given sublingual heparin and one-half received conventional treatment. During the period of observation, averaging more than 2 years per patient, there were 12 recurrent infarctions in the heparin-treated group and 38 in the control group. This difference is statistically significant.
ACCESSION #
16365541

 

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