TITLE

TRANSFORMATION OF THE VASCULAR SYSTEM IN COLD-INJURED TISSUE OF THE RABBIT'S EAR

AUTHOR(S)
Bellman, Sven; Strömbeck, Jan Olof
PUB. DATE
April 1960
SOURCE
Angiology;Apr1960, Vol. 11 Issue 2, p108
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Cold injuries were induced on rabbits' ears by freezing with metal rods at a temperature of nearly -20°C for from 2 to 20 min. and subsequent rapid thawing. Tissue loss and shrinkage were small; they tended to be larger after the longer periods of freezing. The hair on the injured region regrew after a few weeks; on the marginal region between frown and sorrounding tissue it was often longer than on any other, part of the distal portion of the ear, and m brown and black animals it was gray or white. Microangiography showed a variety of patterns of vascular damage and repair. The minute blood vessels—capillaries, fine arterioles and venules—often appeared normal after the shorter lasting cold traumas. Shortly after the longer periods of freezing they often appeared to be excluded from the circulation m part of the injured tissue, varying from small areas near the margin of the ear to almost the whole of the region that had been frozen. In many cases the minute blood vessels reappeared with their previous pattern within a few days; usually this was after rather short cold traumas. In those cases in which this did not occur, necrosis did not necessarily develop but the injured tissue could be revascularized from the marginal zone. This occurred even when a substantial part of the larger vessels of the injured region had disappeared Arterial filling defects were frequently observed within the cold-injured tissue during the first one to three weeks after the cold trauma. Their nature is not established, but they looked like clots or thrombi. They all disappeared, in some cases apparently breaking up and gradually being disposed of. In most cases the arterial lumen gradually became constricted at the site where a defect had been located, progressing occasionally to complete stenosis. Most constrictions remained constant once they had fully developed; regress or even return to normal was, however, occasionally observed. Arterial constrictions and interruptions without preceding filling defects were also seen; they behaved in the same way as the others. Venous filling defects or total occlusions were frequently observed during the first week after the trauma; often they appeared to increase until up to two weeks after the trauma. Only occasionally did these changes disappear; usually they led to interruption of the affected veins. The arterial and venous changes tended to be more pronounced and more extensive after the longer periods of freezing, but the range of variation was very great so that occasionally the changes after a short period of freezing were rather severe and those after the longest period of freezing fairly slight. In the zone between frozen and surrounding tissue there was a varying degree of vascular reaction. In some cases, particularly after short cold traumas, it was faint and lasted for a few days only. In others it was strong and lasted longer. When the original minute blood vessels of the injured tissue had been permanently occluded, the marginal system of fine vessels often penetrated part or even the whole of the injured region. The ingrowing fine vessels developed larger channels rather similar to the normal vascular system of the ear. Three to six weeks after the trauma many branches of this system disappeared and the end result was a sparse vasculature with a shrunken appearance in the injured region; however, this change was not related to macroscopic shrinkage of the injured tissue. Similar changes often took place in preexisting blood vessels of the injured tissue, sometimes with very slight preceding signs of vascular damage during the first one or two weeks after the cold trauma.
ACCESSION #
16365401

 

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