TITLE

EFFECT OF AN ORAL CONTRACEPTIVE DRUG ON NON-ARTERIOSCLEROTIC, MALE AND FEMALE VIRGIN RATS VS. ARTERIOSCLEROTIC, MALE AND FEMALE BREEDER RATS

AUTHOR(S)
Wexler, Bernard C.
PUB. DATE
March 1974
SOURCE
Angiology;Mar1974, Vol. 25 Issue 3, p197
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Male and female virgin rats, with no arteriosclerosis and male anti female breeder rats with pre-existing arteriosclerosis were given chronic injections of a contraceptive drug, Enovid, for 4, 8, and 12 weeks. All of the treated animals exhibited a marked loss in body weight, adrenal glandular hypertrophy and hemorrhage concomitant with severe thymus gland involution, degranulation of pituitary gonadotrophic cells, and testicular and ovarian atrophy. Serum enzymes, e.g., CPK, SGOT, SGPT & LDH, were first greatly elevated and thon their level receded. The Enovid-treated animals developed a fatty liver, hypertriglyceridemia, elevated free fatty acids and hypercholesterolemia. Although the drug-treated animals were acutely diabetic, all of them eventually manifested hypoglycemia despite beta cell degranulation. Serum corticosterone levels were subnormal suggestive of adrenal �exhaustion.� The outstanding finding was the appearance of microscopic arterial lesions in the previously non-arteriosclerotic male and female virgin rats. There was no exacerbation of the arterial lesions in breeder rats with pre-existing arteriosclerosis. Lesions were found in the aorta, and its side branches consisting of intimal mucopolysaccharide, collagen, elastolytic changes and calcification. It is believed that the contraceptive drug upset hypothalamic and gonadal hormone homeostasis which led to endogenous hormonal-metabolic alterations favoring the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in both male and female rats.
ACCESSION #
16352254

 

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