TITLE

THE EFFECT OF A DISTURBED GAIT ON PERIPHERAL OCCLUSIVE ARTERIAL DISEASE

AUTHOR(S)
Popkin, Roy J.
PUB. DATE
October 1957
SOURCE
Angiology;Oct1957, Vol. 8 Issue 5, p397
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
It is recognized that in the treatment of peripheral occlusive arterial disease, the primary aim is to increase the arterial circulation to satisfy the individual needs of the patient. Factors which increase the need or aggravate the arterial insufficiency are equally important. Disturbances of gait, as limping seriously aggravate subjective and objective symptoms of peripheral occlusive arterial disease, especially in the opposite limb. A limping gait increases the work load in the opposite extremity. This increased work load requires an increased arterial blood flow which cannot be met in arterial occlusive disease. A previously asymptomatic limb often becomes symptomatic under these circumstances because of the additional load. A relative arterial ischemia similar to angina pectoris on effort is present. The increased work load often leads to an increased number of amputations in the opposite member. This is of great importance in the management of industrial injuries and of peripheral vascular cases in general. If a full restoration to a normal gait is impossible, measures to reduce the work load such as the use of a cane, shortening the stride, or slowing the pace might become necessary.
ACCESSION #
16352041

 

Related Articles

  • Physical Training and Antiplatelet Treatment in Stage II Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease: Alone or Combined? Mannarino, Elmo; Pasqualini, Leonella; Innocente, Salvatore; Scricciolo, Vito; Rignanese, Antonio; Ciuffetti, Giovanni // Angiology;Jul1991, Vol. 42 Issue 7, p513 

    The efficacy of physical training alone or combined with antiplatelet therapy (dipyridamole and aspirin) was studied in 30 patients with stage II peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). Patients were randomly allocated to one of the following groups: Group A-dipyridamole 75 mg three times...

  • ASSESSMENT OF LEG ISCHAEMIA. Nicholaides, Andrew W. // BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition);11/23/91, Vol. 303 Issue 6813, p1323 

    Examines the difficulties in the diagnosis of leg ischaemia with coexistent arthritis in Great Britain. Diagnostic considerations for the probable occurrence of arterial diseases in leg ischaemia; Methods of clinical examinations for ischaemia; Aspects of non-invasive tests for proper diagnosis...

  • The Penile Brachial Index in the Preoperative Evaluation of Arterial Hypogastric Insufficiency. Setacci, Carlo // Vascular Surgery;May/Jun1986, Vol. 20 Issue 3, p162 

    Two hundred and 30 patients with occlusive arterial disease of the legs were examined by angiography and penile brachial index (P.B.I.) obtained with ultrasound technique. Forty-two cases had no reduction or less than 20% reduction of the cross section area of hypogastric artery the penile...

  • Lycium barbarum Polysaccharide Prevents Focal Cerebral Ischemic Injury by Inhibiting Neuronal Apoptosis in Mice. Wang, Tengfei; Li, Yuxiang; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhou, Ru; Ma, Lin; Hao, Yinju; Jin, Shaoju; Du, Juan; Zhao, Chengjun; Sun, Tao; Yu, Jianqiang // PLoS ONE;Mar2014, Vol. 9 Issue 3, p1 

    Aims of the Study: To investigate the neuroprotective effect of Lycium barbarum polysaccharide (LBP) on focal cerebral ischemic injury in mice and to explore its possible mechanism. Materials and Methods: Male ICR mice were used to make the model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) after...

  • Hyperhomocysteinemia, Aortic Thrombus, and Peripheral Arterial Emboli. Sindhav, Jivantika B.; Comp, Philip C.; Chandrasekaran, Krishnaswamy // Angiology;Jul1999, Vol. 50 Issue 7, p599 

    A young Native American woman presented with ischemia of the left lower limb resulting from embolic occlusion of the left common iliac artery and left femoral artery. The source of her emboli was aortic thrombus. The only underlying abnormality responsible for her hypercoagulability appeared to...

  • VISUALIZATION OF AORTIC AND ARTERIAL OCCLUSION BY PERCUTANEOUS PUNCTURE OR CATHETERIZATION OF PERIPHERAL ARTERIES. Seldinger, Sven I. // Angiology;Feb1957, Vol. 8 Issue 1, p73 

    An arteriographic method is described for the localization of occlusions at different sites in the aorta or peripheral arteries by means of percutaneous puncture of or catheterization through a peripheral artery. The contrast medium can always be injected in proper relation to the occlusion, and...

  • Intraoperative skeletal muscle ischemia contributes to risk of renal dysfunction following thoracoabdominal aortic repair. Miller, Charles C.; Villa, Martin A.; Achouh, Paul; Estrera, Anthony L.; Azizzadeh, Ali; Coogan, Sheila M.; Porat, Eyal E.; Safi, Hazim J. // European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery;Apr2008, Vol. 33 Issue 4, p691 

    Abstract: Objective: Renal dysfunction is among the most commonly occurring morbidities following descending thoracic and thoracoabdominal aortic repair. We hypothesized that myoglobin nephrotoxicity might arise from leg ischemia caused by femoral artery cannulation, which is required for distal...

  • Inhibition of neointimal formation and hyperplasia in vein grafts by external stent/sheath. Desai, Mital; Mirzay-Razzaz, Jalaledin; von Delft, Dirk; Sarkar, Sandip; Hamilton, George; Seifalian, Alexander M. // Vascular Medicine;2010, Vol. 15 Issue 4, p287 

    Synthetic and to a lesser extent vein graft failure is still a major problem in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease, with neointimal hyperplasia being the main cause for graft occlusion in the medium and long term. This review aims to establish the current status of external stents or...

  • INTERMITTENT OCCLUSION OF THE INTERNAL CAROTID ARTERY BY DETACHED INTIMA. Robicsek, Francis; Alexander, James P.; Sanger, Paul W.; Taylor, Frederick H.; Galucci, Vincenro // Angiology;Jan1965, Vol. 16 Issue 1, p18 

    A case of a 64-year-old man is presented, who had intermittent occlusion of the internal carotid artery caused by a flap of partially detached intima. The clinical features of this patient, with special emphasis on radiodiagnostics are discussed in detail.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics