TITLE

THROMBOLYTIC TREATMENT WITH I.V. BRINASE OF ADVANCED ARTERIAL OBLITERATIVE DISEASE OF THE LIMBS

AUTHOR(S)
Lund, F.; Ekeström, S.; Frisch, E. P.; Magaard, F.
PUB. DATE
July 1975
SOURCE
Angiology;Jul/Aug1975, Vol. 26 Issue 7, p534
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The material includes 17 patients suffering from different degrees of chronic peripheral arterial disease (11 chronic patients stage III and IV. two patients with acute arterial occlusion, and four patients stage II). Presence and extent of arterial occlusion was ascertained by initial arteriography. In twelve of the patients amputation had been considered. The patients were treated by a series of i.v. infusions of brinase, a proteolytic enzyme from Aspergillus oryzae. The brinase inhibitor capacity in plasma was determined by the azocollagen technique. Dosage of brinase was calculated to retain a rest-inhibitor capacity in order to avoid free proteolytic activity. In five patients the enzyme was also given preoperatively by intra-arterial instillation prior to a series of i.v. brinase infusions. Thirteen patients showed clinical improvement after brinase treatment. The condition of two patients remained unchanged, and in two patients amputation could not be avoided. In fourteen patients the treatment results were followed by measurement of peripheral systolic blood pressure. In ten patients obvious increase of the peripheral systolic blood pressure was observed. Cutaneous microcirculation was studied in seven patients by i.v. sequential fluorescein angiography and signs of improved microcirculation (appearance time, intensity and/or extent of fluorescence) were found in all examined patients. One patient with acute arterial occlusion of the right leg with obstruction of blood flow from the external iliac artery showed complete disobliteration after a series of i.v. brinase infusions. Bleeding complications associated with brinase treatment were not observed in the material. In three patients brinase treatment was discontinued because of complications (2 brinase, 1 heparin).
ACCESSION #
16352033

 

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