TITLE

VASCULAR HEADACHES AND RELATED PHENOMENA

AUTHOR(S)
Hansel, French K.
PUB. DATE
October 1956
SOURCE
Angiology;Oct1956, Vol. 7 Issue 5, p457
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Although vascular headaches represent one of the most common medical complaints, few physicians are familiar with their most effective management. Classification into different types is difficult because of the variable clinical patterns and the overlapping of types. In general, however, the following groups are the most distinctive: (1) migraine, (2) migraine-tension, (3) histaminic cephalalgia (Horton), and (4) allergic headache. The attacks of headache tend to follow certain patterns of vasoconstriction, vasodilatation and edema. Typical migraine begins with a vasoconstrictor phase, characterized by pre-headache phenomena such as nausea, vomiting, visual disturbances, etc. This is followed by the vasodilator painful phase and may end in the edema phase in which there is thickening of the vessel walls. With the so-called migraine-tension type, the symptoms are somewhat the same as those of migraine. The histaminic cephalalgia (Horton (15)) headache is of the distinct vasodilator type. Allergic headache is usually associated with other manifestations of allergy and is characterized by the occurrence of cerebral, as well as generalized edema. The management of these headache patterns is a medical and not a surgical problem so it is important that the patient should not be subjected to various major and minor surgical procedures such as resection of the trigeminal nerve, nose and sinus operations, the removal of teeth, etc. Since there is a tendency in general, of vascular instability among headache patients, it is important to eliminate the use of tobacco, alcohol, and coffee. In the migraine and tension types of headache, attention to psychosomatic factors is important as they often precipitate headache. Most headache patients have tried a variety of drugs such as the antipyretics, antihistamines, and sedatives, without satisfactory relief. In the management of attacks the choice of the drug or combination of drugs is important. Vasoconstrictors such as the various ergot compounds, caffeine, octin, amphetamines combined with barbiturates, belladonna alkaloids and antipyretics represent the most known preparations employed today. Histamine or nicotinic acid therapy is often of great benefit in the management of these cases so should always be given a trial in therapy.
ACCESSION #
16350398

 

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