TITLE

Southeast Asia's intimidated press

AUTHOR(S)
DeVoss, David
PUB. DATE
March 1978
SOURCE
Columbia Journalism Review;Mar/Apr1978, Vol. 16 Issue 6, p37
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article examines developmental journalism in Southeast Asia and how Southeast Asian governments curb on press freedom. The Press Foundation of Asia propounded the theory of developmental journalism. What Southeast Asia needed, said the foundation was a generation of investigative reporters trained in economics who could explain the ins and outs of poverty to their readers. Some journalists responded to the call of the foundation but before they could get organized, the term was coopted by government information ministries insisting that a developmental journalist's duty was to become the nation's partner in progress. That the Press Foundation of Asia's idea of developmental journalism was never effectively practiced is just one result of the fact that in most of Southeast Asia today, the press either is effectively controlled by government or, even where free, is generally timid and ineffectual. It must be admitted, however, that Southeast Asian governments cannot be accused of subverting a tradition of good journalism. Even after the introduction of the concept of developmental journalism, Asia's dailies gave more space to sensation than to local land reform. The developing governments in Southeast Asia are not ready for an adversary press, but recently some of them are showing that they are willing to tolerate and even react favorably toward criticism.
ACCESSION #
16303727

 

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