TITLE

Can three billion peasants be 'covered'?

AUTHOR(S)
Critchfield, Richard
PUB. DATE
January 1978
SOURCE
Columbia Journalism Review;Jan/Feb1978, Vol. 16 Issue 5, p32
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article notes the failure of U.S. journalists to cover the condition of the world's three billion people who are peasants as of January 1978. Three-fourths of the world's people receive very little attention from U.S. reporters. They are peasants who are still traditional subsistence cultivators of land. According to the author, there should be no doubt that these people are worth the attention of reporters: all the major contemporary revolutions have involved peasant societies. The author points out that the 450 or so U.S. correspondents, as of January 1978, only rarely report on these billions, because the peasants live in the villages, while the governments, wealth, and power are in the cities. The working foreign correspondent rarely can afford to be away from the capital for more than a few days. The author observes that if the world's poor are not rioting, revolting, or dying of famine, they are customarily kept out of sight and out of mind. According to the author, reporting villages has its own internal; contradictions, since it is an attempt to interest readers in something remote than their natural interests and daily lives. The author believes that reporting from the world's villages may be one way to watch the development of a worldwide crisis.
ACCESSION #
16303564

 

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