TITLE

Beyond Agnewism

AUTHOR(S)
Balk, Alfred
PUB. DATE
November 1969
SOURCE
Columbia Journalism Review;Winter1969/1970, Vol. 8 Issue 4, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article comments on the mass media credibility problems in the U.S. When former U.S. Vice President Spiro Agnew delivered his two polemics against the media in November 1969, it was not the fact that they conveyed the White House displeasure with the press that was historic. They were significant, first, as the only time a U.S. official had devoted two consecutive prepared speeches to castigating the news media. Secondly, coupled with other actions, they seemed to constitute prominent elements in a developing political strategy. Agnew's two anti-media speeches merits more than cursory analysis. But there are other reasons as well. One is the noteworthy number of factual errors they contain and second there is the exceedingly emotional level on which they appealed to some listeners. Both speeches were selective in the specific media organizations; both were sharply anti-Eastern. In the study How Newspapers Use Columnists, Ben Bagdikian found that of all syndicated columns used in dailies, only 37 percent of the columns run were liberal, contrasted to 29 percent which were very conservative. Technology, urbanization, education and other engines of rapid social change have at least temporarily fragmented the American society. With this fragmentation and the disorientation inherent in rapid change have come heightened pressures on the news media.
ACCESSION #
16261983

 

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