TITLE

Prehistoric Maritime Adaptations of the Subarctic and Subantarctic Zones: The Aleutian/Fuegian Connection Reconsidered

AUTHOR(S)
Yesner, David R.
PUB. DATE
September 2004
SOURCE
Arctic Anthropology;2004, Vol. 41 Issue 2, p76
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In 1975, Allen P. McCartney proposed that Aleutian and Fuegian populations shared a number of common subsistence and technology features, resulting from convergence in adaptation to maritime resources in cold archipelagos. As a result of recent excavations on the north Beagle Channel in Argentine Tierra del Fuego, as well as reconsideration of the historic and ethnographic records, it is now possible to flesh out such a comparative analysis in much greater detail. Both Aleutian and Fuegian populations exploited pinnipeds (sea lions and fur seals) and shellfish (mussels and limpets) in a cold, windy coastal zone, and both regions show an intriguing convergence in the history of subsistence, with a shift from sea mammal hunting to shellfish use occurring around 4,000 years ago. Although differences in resource use (i.e., greater dependence on terrestrial mammals [guanaco] in Tierra del Fuego versus the use of storable anadromous fish in the Aleutians) led to the development of greater sociopolitical complexity among the Aleuts, there is now archaeological evidence to suggest that greater complexity existed in precontact Fuegian populations as well. Most of the differences observed between the groups are probably the result of historical transformations brought about by the depredations of European sealers and whalers he ginning in the late eighteenth century.
ACCESSION #
16247414

 

Related Articles

  • Shellfish. D. R. H. // Encyclopaedia of Aboriginal Australia;1994, Vol. 2, p981 

    An encyclopedia entry for the term "shellfish" is presented. Remains of old shellfish meals are found from southwest Tasmania to the tip of Cape York, Queensland and from the New South Wales coast to the rivers and fossil lakes of the inland. Shellfish were gathered on reefs at low tide, on...

  • LITERATURA ORAL KAWÉSQAR: CUENTO DEL PÁJARO CARPINTERO Y SU ESPOSA, LA MUJER TIUQUE CUARTA PARTE: TEXTO GLOSADO. F., Óscar E. Aguilera; P., José Tonko // Onomázein;2008, Vol. 17 Issue 1, p11 

    A story from the scarcely documented Kawesqar oral literature. This fourth part presents the glossed Kawesqar text and its Spanish literal translation with the source language order of words.

  • Allen P. McCartney's Contributions to Canadian Archaeology: A Photo Essay. Wenzel, George W.; Savelle, James M. // Arctic Anthropology;2004, Vol. 41 Issue 2, p197 

    Over his forty-year career, Allen's contributions to the archaeology of the North American Arctic were many, and his research extended from Thule times to the present and from the Aleutian Islands to North Alaska, and Hudson Bay to the Canadian High Arctic. The papers in this volume by our...

  • A Processual Investigation of a Thule Whale Bone House, Somerset Island, Arctic Canada. Savelle, James M.; Habu, Junko // Arctic Anthropology;2004, Vol. 41 Issue 2, p204 

    In 1991, the authors excavated a Thule Inuit whale bone house at site PaJs-13 on southeast Somerset Island, Arctic Canada. Detailed analyses of house stratigraphy provide useful data for the study of the cultural and natural formation processes relating to the feature. Based on our analyses, and...

  • 'Poor man's tucker' - historic and contemporary consumption of longbum shellfish around Darwin. Bourke, Patricia // Northern Territory Naturalist;Jun2015, Issue 26, p4 

    This paper describes archaeological and ethnographic observations of the remains - scatters of shells of mostly Telescopium telescopium plus several Terebralia species - of historic and contemporary consumption of longbum shellfish (Mollusca: Potamididae) by Aboriginal people around Darwin.

  • Editor's Note.  // Arctic Anthropology;2004, Vol. 41 Issue 2, p1 

    This article presents information on arctic community with special reference of Allen P. McCartney. It talks about a conference "Thule Eskimo Culture: An Archaeological Perspective," which was organized by McCartney, in which international array of researchers giving papers concerning the Thule...

  • CHARTING A COURSE: Shellfish Aquaculture and Indigenous Rights in New Zealand and British Columbia. Tollefson, Chris; Scott, Robert // BC Studies;Summer2006, Issue 150, p3 

    The article discusses the potential for shellfish aquaculture in British Columbia (BC) and its possibility to become the major industry among coastal communities of BC. Long coastline along British Columbia and its cold clean marine water facilitate the farming of shellfish. Traditional...

  • Shellfish Purple in Coastal Ecuador. Stothert, Karen E. // Textile Museum Journal;2003/2004, Vol. 42/43, p98 

    The article presents an historical account for shellfish-dyeing technique for textile fabrics in Ecuador. It mentions that Santa Elena Peninsula, a Spanish-speaking area, was the center for the production of shellfish purple-dyed yarn which was a tribute paid by the indigenous people in the...

  • Shell Middens. J. P. W. // Encyclopaedia of Aboriginal Australia;1994, Vol. 2, p982 

    An encyclopedia entry for the term "shell middens" is presented. The term refers to the remains of meals of shellfish which are formed anywhere that people dumped the unwanted shells. Shell middens are common around much of Australia's coastline, as well as along the shores of some rivers and lakes.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics