TITLE

Another Branch on the Family Tree

PUB. DATE
November 1986
SOURCE
Archaeology;Nov/Dec86, Vol. 39 Issue 6, p78
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the flurry of interpretation among students of evolution set off by the discovery of a hominid skull in Kenya by Alan Walker of the John Hopkins University. Prevailing view that the fossil points to a three-pronged diagram of the human family tree; Alteration of the Australopithecus line formerly thought to move successively through three species.
ACCESSION #
15966530

 

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