TITLE

Body of Evidence

AUTHOR(S)
Peretz, Martin
PUB. DATE
February 2005
SOURCE
New Republic;2/14/2005, Vol. 232 Issue 5, p38
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Profiles French scientist Marie Curie and her impact on the role of women in science. Details of the book "Madame Curie," by the scientists daughter, Eve; Sex discrimination faced by Curie in France and the United States; Reflections on Curie's influence in light of comments made by Harvard University President Larry Summers on sex differences between men and women in the sciences; Reaction of the academic community to Summer's comments; Criticism for the logic behind Summers' views.
ACCESSION #
15962028

 

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