TITLE

What's Hiding In Your Datacenter?

AUTHOR(S)
Robb, Drew
PUB. DATE
February 2005
SOURCE
Business Communications Review;Feb2005, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p56
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents information on the computer network protocol DECnet. IP is far simpler to learn, easier to program and relatively easy to implement compared to DECnet. IP's power and ubiquity make it impossible to ignore, but that doesn't mean it is perfect. Commonly reported drawbacks, compared to older protocols, are that IP is not kind to network bandwidth, is open to view and too easily hacked. DECnet stalwarts deride IP as being much too laborious on the management side. They complain about time-consuming and problematic tasks with regard to subnet masks, default gateways, multiple IP addresses per routing host and the frequent changes needed in IP addresses during cabling upgrades. Such shortcomings appear to trace back to the same design assumptions of IP that also fostered its universality. But it's the security arena that seems to be the biggest reason for holding onto DECnet and its associated hardware. Some criticize TCP/IP as being too open to view by anyone with a network monitor, and TELNET as too easily used by hackers spoofing protocols. DECnet is also well protected through its association with VMS. At the recent DefCon 9 Hacker Conference, VMS did so well at thwarting hackers that it was invited never to return. It beat out NT, XP, Solaris, Linux, BSD and others, to earn a grade of unhackable by some of the best hackers in the business.
ACCESSION #
15951354

 

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