TITLE

PRESCHOOLERS' DIETS: Past and Present

PUB. DATE
February 2005
SOURCE
Scholastic Parent & Child;Feb/Mar2005, Vol. 12 Issue 4, p70
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that according to a recent study reported in the American Journal of Public Health, preschoolers eat healthier foods than they did a generation ago. Today's kids eat more whole grains, fruits, and vegetables and take in more iron — an important nutrient for mental and motor development. But they also consume more juice and sugar — and about 200 more calories a day — than their predecessors.
ACCESSION #
15894083

 

Related Articles

  • Speaking of bigger bagels...  // Tufts University Health & Nutrition Letter;Apr98, Vol. 16 Issue 2, p8 

    Looks at the actual serving sizes of foods in relation to the government's recommended serving. Reason for the consumer's wrong idea about serving size; Average weight of bagels and muffins.

  • Zigzag Dieting. Berg, Michael // Men's Fitness;Mar2002, Vol. 18 Issue 3, p78 

    Presents a dieting scheme for burning fat but sparing the muscle. Information on calorie cycling; List of high protein foods; Benefits from calorie cycling.

  • Target Group-Oriented Food Programs: Cost Effectiveness Comparisons. Selowsky, Marcelo // American Journal of Agricultural Economics;Dec79, Vol. 61 Issue 5, p988 

    Evaluates target group-oriented food programs in terms of their effectiveness in increasing food and calorie consumption. Cost effectiveness comparisons of the programs; Implications of the change in the composition of food consumption; Food consumption in poor families.

  • DROP 5. Hampl, Jeff // Men's Fitness;Sep2006, Vol. 22 Issue 7, p37 

    This article provides information on the number of calories a person loses with different types of activities and diet options. According to the author, every half hour of swimming eats up 175 calories. A one-hour class of power yoga can burn off up to 350 calories. Substituting Big Mac and...

  • Associations between characteristics of the home food environment and fruit and vegetable intake in preschool children: A cross-sectional study.  // BMC Public Health;2011, Vol. 11 Issue 1, p938 

    The article focuses on the study which identifies the characteristics of the home food environment that are associated with higher fruit and vegetable consumption in a sample of Australian preschool children. It states that these characteristics could be considered potential targets for...

  • Impact of breakfast on daily energy intake - an analysis of absolute versus relative breakfast calories. Schusdziarra, Volker; Hausmann, Margit; Wittke, Claudia; Mittermeier, Johanna; Kellner, Marietta; Naumann, Aline; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Erdmann, Johannes // Nutrition Journal;2011, Vol. 10, p5 

    Objective: The role of breakfast energy in total daily energy intake is a matter of debate. Acute feeding experiments demonstrated that high breakfast energy leads to greater overall intake supported by cross-sectional data of a free-living population. On the other hand, a large intraindividual...

  • Rye kernel breakfast increases satiety in the afternoon - an effect of food structure. Isaksson, Hanna; Rakha, Allah; Andersson, Roger; Fredriksson, Helena; Olsson, Johan; Åman, Per // Nutrition Journal;2011, Vol. 10, p31 

    Background: The structure of whole grain cereals is maintained to varying degrees during processing and preparation of foods. Food structure can influence metabolism, including perceived hunger and satiety. A diet that enhances satiety per calorie may help to prevent excessive calorie intake....

  • a menu for moms. Howard, Beth // Baby Talk;Jun/Jul2005, Vol. 70 Issue 5, p102 

    Gives advice to mothers on keeping their nutritional habits in tact after pregnancy. Consumption of extra calories daily; Foods included in a healthy diet; Importance of completing meals.

  • The latest government studies reveal that Americans still get more cals. from fat than is recommended. How are you cutting menu cals.?  // FoodService Director;11/15/98, Vol. 11 Issue 11, p36 

    Opinion. Highlights the views of United States foodservice industry executives on different ways they employ to cut calories from their menu. Promotion of healthy food; Butter versus margarine; Mission Nutrition program; Fat content and level of calories; Fruit and vegetable offering; Lowfat...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics