TITLE

On the nature, consequences and remedies of workplace incivility: No time for "nice"? Think again

AUTHOR(S)
Pearson, Christine M.; Porath, Christine L.
PUB. DATE
February 2005
SOURCE
Academy of Management Executive;Feb2005, Vol. 19 Issue 1, p7
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Incivility, or employees' lack of regard for one another, is costly to organizations in subtle and pervasive ways. Although uncivil behaviors occur commonly, many organizations fail to recognize them, few understand their harmful effects, and most managers and executives are ill-equipped to deal with them. Over the past eight years, as we have learned about this phenomenon through interviews, focus groups, questionnaires, experiments, and executive forums with more than 2,400 people across the U.S. and Canada, we have found that incivility causes its targets, witnesses, and additional stakeholders to act in ways that erode organizational values and deplete organizational resources. Because of their experiences of workplace incivility, employees decrease work effort, time on the job, productivity, and performance. Where incivility is not curtailed, job satisfaction and organizational loyalty diminish as well. Some employees leave their jobs solely because of the impact of this subtle form of deviance. Most of these consequences occur without organizational awareness. In addition to detailing the nature of incivility and its consequences, we provide keys to recognizing and dealing with habitual instigators, and remedies that are being used effectively by organizations to curtail and correct employee-to-employee incivility.
ACCESSION #
15841946

 

Related Articles

  • A Multivariate Study of Absence from Work. Johns, Gary // Academy of Management Proceedings (00650668);1978, p69 

    This research examined the relationship between absenteeism and personal characteristics, leadership style, and job content. Frequency of absence was a more sensitive criterion than days absent, and significant correlates of absence emerged from each predictor group, although there was...

  • Institutionalization of ethics and its consequences: a survey of marketing professionals. Singhapakdi, Anusorn; Vitell, Scott J. // Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science;Summer2007, Vol. 35 Issue 2, p284 

    Because of increasing ethical problems in business, organizations have tried to control these problems by institutionalizing ethics, such as by creating new ethics positions and formulating codes of ethics. In this study, the authors develop a scale for measuring the institutionalization of...

  • How to… manage office moaners. Beagrie, Scott // Personnel Today;10/31/2006, p29 

    The article presents information on managing office moaners. Office moaners are found in most of the offices. They can drop a person's morale and career outlook. The quality of office life can improve with proper management of a chronic office moaner. Holding an informal meeting with the moaner...

  • THE IMPACT OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS CLIMATE, ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT, AND UNION LOYALTY ON ORGANIZATIONAL PERFORMANCE: A LONGITUDINAL STUDY. DEERY, STEPHEN J.; IVERSON, RODERICK D. // Academy of Management Proceedings & Membership Directory;1999, pC1 

    This paper utilizes the theoretical framework of Gordon and Ladd (1990) to examine the relationship between industrial relations climate, organizational commitment and union loyalty and bank branch performance. Specifically, we investigate the factors that influence the development of a...

  • Ideology And The Decline Of Management Theory. Nehrbass, Richard G. // Academy of Management Review;Jul1979, Vol. 4 Issue 3, p427 

    The article explores the role of ideology in the formation, development and dissemination of management theory. Organizational theorizing is often ideological and based on assumptions they may not be true. This biasing is responsible for the continuation of inappropriate managerial practices....

  • Person-Environment Congruence and Work Satisfaction. Tziner, Aharon E.; Vardi, Yoav // Academy of Management Proceedings (00650668);1982, p151 

    The canonical correlation analysis method was employed to ascertain the strength of association between the occupational rewards - occupational needs congruence and job satisfaction. A canonical coefficient of .89 (p < .01) was revealed, thus indicating that a strong association exists. However,...

  • Twenty Questions: Utilizing Job Satisfaction Measures. Roberts, Karlene H.; Savage, Frederick // California Management Review;Spring73, Vol. 15 Issue 3, p82 

    There is ample evidence that shows that satisfaction is negatively related to absenteeism and turnover and that it is always a good idea for managers to know how their employees feel about their job. This article presents managers with strategy for determining if attitude surveys should be taken...

  • Organizational Participation: A Critique and Model. Forrest, Christopher R.; Cummings, L. L.; Johnson, Alton C. // Academy of Management Review;Oct77, Vol. 2 Issue 4, p586 

    A critique of the current state of theory and research on employee tardiness, absenteeism, turnover and job choice is presented. Research and theory reviewed illustrate problems and unresolved issues underlying current knowledge of the determinants of organizational participation. An expanded...

  • In Business Use the Golden Rule. Denton, D. Keith // Organization Development Journal;Fall2008, Vol. 26 Issue 3, p55 

    "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." It is a little rule often overlooked but one with a big impact. One study after another demonstrates that fairness in procedures, interpersonal treatment, and outcomes is a critical factor influencing a wide range of employee attitudes like...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics