TITLE

Communication Forms and Functions of Children and Adults With Severe Mental Retardation in Community and Institutional Settings

AUTHOR(S)
McLean[*], Lee K.; Brady[**], Nancy C.; McLean, James E.; Behrens, Gene Ann
PUB. DATE
February 1999
SOURCE
Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research;Feb1999, Vol. 42 Issue 1, p231
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Assesses the forms and functions of expressive communication produced by individuals with severe mental retardation. Methodology; Communication frequencies and functions; Discussion.
ACCESSION #
1579308

 

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