TITLE

The Ethics of Self-Sacrifice

AUTHOR(S)
Milbank, John
PUB. DATE
March 1999
SOURCE
First Things: A Monthly Journal of Religion & Public Life;Mar1999, Issue 91, p33
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Examines the notion that the highest ethical gesture is a sacrificial self-offering which expects no benefit in return. Characteristics of self-giving according to ethical thinkers; Suggestion of the notion on sacrificial offering that to be ethical is to be prepared to lose oneself for the other; Author's criticisms against the notion of self-sacrifice.
ACCESSION #
1578581

 

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