TITLE

Reshaping noise reduction on aircraft

AUTHOR(S)
Fisher, Richard
PUB. DATE
January 2005
SOURCE
Engineer (00137758);1/14/2005, Vol. 293 Issue 7666, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that a company backed by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Continuum Dynamics Inc., is developing aircraft engine noise-reduction chevrons that can change their shape in very high-temperature exhausts. Noise-reduction chevrons are a well-established technology to mix the fan flow behind an engine, but they can degrade thrust performance at cruise altitude. Continuum plans to investigate suitable materials such as three-component doped alloys including palladium, platinum and niobium, as developed at NASA Glenn Research Centre.
ACCESSION #
15694895

 

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