TITLE

Negotiating with Post-Soviet Military Officers

AUTHOR(S)
Shea, Timothy C.
PUB. DATE
November 2004
SOURCE
Military Review;Nov/Dec2004, Vol. 84 Issue 6, p42
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Offers a look at the differences between U.S. and post-Soviet military officers' negotiating principles. Insight into the U.S. negotiating model; Overview of the Russian approach; Significance of earning respect among the negotiators; Important things to consider when negotiating with Russian officers.
ACCESSION #
15682665

 

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