TITLE

VICTIM JUSTICE

PUB. DATE
December 1995
SOURCE
New Republic;12/11/95, Vol. 213 Issue 24, p9
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the emotions of a crime victim by citing views of Robert Giugliano, a crime victim, during the trial of criminal Colin Ferguson. Opinion that the victims of crime must be provided opportunity to find catharsis for their pain; Views that epithets in a courtroom may indeed be therapeutic for victims, but personal therapy is not a defensible purpose of criminal trials; Comments that requirement of the rule of law is that judges and juries must be personally impartial, that they can't decide even close cases on the basis of their sympathy or distaste for one party or another; Argument of Paul Gewirtz, a law professor, that celebration of emotionalism in criminal trials is part of a broader and Oprah-esque trend in public life.
ACCESSION #
15508254

 

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