TITLE

Symptoms and medical conditions in Australian veterans of the 1991 Gulf War: relation to immunisations and other Gulf War exposures

AUTHOR(S)
Kelsall, H. L.; Sim, M. R.; Forbes, A. B.; Glass, D. C.; McKenzie, D. P.; Ikin, J. F.; Abramson, M. J.; Blizzard, L.; Ittak, P.
PUB. DATE
December 2004
SOURCE
Occupational & Environmental Medicine;Dec2004, Vol. 61 Issue 12, p1006
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Aims: To investigate whether Australian Gulf War veterans have a higher than expected prevalence of recent symptoms and medical conditions that were first diagnosed in the period following the 1991 Gulf War; and if so, whether these effects were associated with exposures and experiences that occurred in the Gulf War. Methods: Cross-sectional study of 1456 Australian Gulf War veterans and a comparison group who were in operational units at the time of the Gulf War, but were not deployed to that conflict (n = 1588). A postal questionnaire was administered and the likelihood of the diagnosis of self-reported medical conditions was assessed and rated by a medical practitioner. Results: Gulf War veterans had a higher prevalence of all self-reported health symptoms than the comparison group, and more of the Gulf War veterans had severe symptoms. Increased symptom reporting was associated with several exposures, including having more than 10 immunisations, pyridostigmine bromide tablets, anti-biological warfare tablets, pesticides, insect repellents, reportedly being in a chemical weapons area, and stressful military service experiences in a strong dose-response relation. Gulf War veterans reported psychological (particularly post-traumatic stress disorder), skin, eye, and sinus conditions first diagnosed in 1991 or later more commonly than the comparison group. Over 90% of medical conditions reported by both study groups were rated by a medical practitioner as having a high likelihood of diagnosis. Conclusion: More than 10 years after the 1991 Gulf War, Australian veterans self-report all symptoms and some medical conditions more commonly than the comparison group. Further analysis of the severity of symptoms and likelihood of the diagnosis of medical conditions suggested that these findings are not due to over-reporting or to participation bias.
ACCESSION #
15376649

 

Related Articles

  • Veterans' Day. Grillo, Jerry // Georgia Trend;Jul2003, Vol. 18 Issue 11, p52 

    Ruth Lee has seen the 80-something survivors of the Greatest Generation, tears running down their wrinkled cheeks, staring at the memorial wall, at names of old comrades whose bones lie deep in the ground of foreign lands. So are the names of 3,200 veterans from Effingham County, from the...

  • Health outcomes of veterans of the Persian Gulf War. Andolsek, Kathryn M. // American Family Physician;2/1/1997, Vol. 55 Issue 2, p674 

    Presents summaries of the articles `Mortality among U.S. veterans of the Persian Gulf War,' by H.K. Kang and T.A. Bullman, `The postwar hospitalization experience of U.S. veterans of the Persian Gulf War,' by G.C. Gray, et al and `Disease and suspicion after the Persian Gulf War,' by E.W....

  • To the Editor:. Korenyi-Both, Andras L. // Military Medicine;Oct2003, Vol. 168 Issue 10, pvi 

    Presents a letter to the editor in response to the article "Chemical Warfare and the Gulf War: A Review of the Impact on Gulf War Veterans' Health," in a 2003 issue of "Military Medicine."

  • To the Editor:. Riddle, James R.; Brown, Mark; Smith, Tyler; Ritchie, Elspeth Cameron; Brix, Kelley Ann; Romano, James // Military Medicine;Oct2003, Vol. 168 Issue 10, pvi 

    Presents a response by James R. Riddle, Mark Brown, Tyler Smith, Elspeth Cameron Ritchie, Kelley Ann Brix and James Romano to a letter to the editor about their article "Chemical Warfare and the Gulf War: A Review of the Impact on Gulf War Veterans' Health," in a 2003 issue of "Military Medicine."

  • Illness tied to a potent `cocktail.' Newman, Richard J.; English, Carey W. // U.S. News & World Report;04/14/97, Vol. 122 Issue 14, p44 

    Focuses on Gulf War syndrome. Research to be presented at a conference of the Experimental Biology Society which may finally help explain some of the symptoms and disabilities claimed by more than 30,000 gulf war veterans; Findings made by Mohamed Abou-Donia regarding insecticides and an...

  • Battle scars take years to surface. Kleiner, Kurt // New Scientist;8/19/95, Vol. 147 Issue 1991, p8 

    Reports the findings of a study by Andy Morgan of the West Haven Veteran's Affairs Medical Center in Connecticut on the symptoms of post-traumatic stress suffered by Gulf war soldiers. Nature of symptoms; Treatment of symptoms.

  • Nerve pill sapped soldiers' defences. Kleiner, Kurt // New Scientist;4/27/96, Vol. 150 Issue 2027, p4 

    Reports that `Gulf War syndrome,' a debilitating collection of ailments afflicting Gulf veterans, may be caused by an exposure to a combination of an anti-nerve gas agent and two pesticides, according to researchers at Duke University and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. ...

  • Britain launches two studies of `Gulf War syndrome' ... O'Brien, Claire // Nature;12/19/1996, Vol. 384 Issue 6610, p604 

    Reports on the decision by Britain's Ministry of Defence (MoD) to conduct two epidemiological studies of illness among Gulf War veterans. The symptoms of `Gulf War syndrome'; Details of how the studies will be conducted.

  • Mixed messages for Gulf War vets.  // U.S. News & World Report;1/20/97, Vol. 122 Issue 2, p11 

    Discusses the finding of a United States presidential panel investigating the so-called gulf-war syndrome. The panel's finding that stress, not chemicals or pollutants, is a likely factor in syndrome's symptoms; Finding of a study in the `Journal of the American Medical Association' (JAMA)...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sign out of this library

Other Topics