TITLE

Tropical spiderwort spreading fast

AUTHOR(S)
Durham, Sharon
PUB. DATE
December 2004
SOURCE
Southeast Farm Press;12/15/2004, Vol. 31 Issue 28, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that tropical spiderwort, a little known weed, has recently spread in alarming proportions in fields in Georgia, Florida and North Carolina. First detected in the United States in the 1930s, the weed has made major gains in Georgia, according to Agricultural Research Service Agronomist Theodore Webster of the Crop Protection and Management Research Unit in Tifton. Georgia. Webster and his colleagues--Michael Burton and Alan York of North Carolina State University, and Stanley Culpepper and Eric Prostko of the University of Georgia--are monitoring the weed's advances.
ACCESSION #
15375447

 

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