TITLE

Good medicine, bad places

AUTHOR(S)
McKenna, Tech. Sgt. Pat
PUB. DATE
December 1998
SOURCE
Airman;Dec98, Vol. 42 Issue 12, p46
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the training of military doctors at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Training of physicians in combat medicine, tropical illnesses, high-velocity gunshot wounds, battlefield triage, trauma and nuclear, chemical and biological injuries; Field exercises; Combination of medicine and military operations.
ACCESSION #
1512844

 

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