TITLE

WHY CHINA WON'T BOW TO BUSH NOW

AUTHOR(S)
Chandler, Clay
PUB. DATE
November 2004
SOURCE
Fortune;11/29/2004, Vol. 150 Issue 11, p52
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses rumors that Chinese leaders will abandon their policy of linking China's currency to the U.S. dollar. China's policy regarding the yuan; Possibility that China plans to revalue its currency; Impact of such rumors on the U.S. dollar; Advantages of a stronger currency for China; Views of analysts and money managers; Significance of comments by Guo Shuqing, head of the foreign exchange department of China's central bank; How China has kept growth on track; Outlook.
ACCESSION #
15098249

 

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