TITLE

HOW TO SUCCEED IN THE JAPANESE MARKET

AUTHOR(S)
Sullivan, Margaret
PUB. DATE
July 1986
SOURCE
FE: The Magazine for Financial Executives;Jul/Aug1986, Vol. 2 Issue 7/8, p20
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on economic relations between the U.S. and Japan. With the yen rising and Japan's domestic economy sagging, opportunities for competing successfully with the Japanese are perhaps better now than they will be for the rest of the century. A variety of financial liberalization measures have also been instituted or are under consideration in Japan. These include granting a limited number of foreign trust banking licenses to Bankers and admitting six foreign firms to Tokyo Stock Exchange membership. However, complications with Japan's complex and entrenched bureaucracy can be a barrier.
ACCESSION #
15090882

 

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