TITLE

LINUX SMACKDOWN PINNED ON SOLARIS 10

AUTHOR(S)
Rooney, Paula
PUB. DATE
November 2004
SOURCE
CRN;11/15/2004, Issue 1121, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the plans of Sun Microsystems to slow the momentum of Red Hat Linux by giving away Solaris 10 and offering free migration services through its services arm and select partners. Plan of Sun to match the business model of Red Hat; Statement issued by Mark McClain, vice president of software marketing at Sun, on Solaris 10; Availability of Solaris 10 for Opteron and for UltraSPARC and x86.
ACCESSION #
15053106

 

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