TITLE

Combined effects of waterlogging and salinity on electrochemistry, water-soluble cations and water dispersible clay in soils with various salinity levels

AUTHOR(S)
Lu, S.G.; Tang, C.; Rengel, Z.
PUB. DATE
July 2004
SOURCE
Plant & Soil;Jul2004, Vol. 264 Issue 1/2, p231
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The combination effects of waterlogging and salinity on redox potential (Eh), pH, electric conductivity (EC), water-soluble cations (NH4+, K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Fe2+, and Mn2+) and water-dispersible clay (WDC) were studied in six soils collected near salt lakes in western Australia. The soils with various salinity levels were incubated under a waterlogged condition at 30 °C for 12 weeks. The Eh, pH, EC, and cations of soil solutions were monitored over the waterlogged period. The Eh values generally dropped to the lowest point within 12 days of waterlogging, then increased slightly, and reached equilibrium after 4 weeks of waterlogging. Increasing salinity levels increased soil Eh. While waterlogging increased soil pH in the first 3–4 weeks, increasing salinity level decreased soil pH during the entire waterlogging period. Waterlogging increased the EC values in the first 2 weeks, partly due to dissolution of insoluble salts. The concentrations of water-soluble NH4+ were significantly increased with salinity level and waterlogging, and reached maximum values at week 2, and then declined to the initial level. Waterlogging and salinity increased the concentrations of water-soluble K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Fe2+, and Mn2+ ions, but the magnitudes of changes were greatly affected by soil properties. Increases in water-soluble K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ were attributed to increased solubility of insoluble salts, and increased competition for the adsorption sites of the soil exchange complex due to elevated concentrations of Na+, Fe2+ and Mn2+. Increases in water-soluble Fe2+ and Mn2+ induced by waterlogging were attributed to the dissolution of Fe and Mn oxides under reduced conditions. Waterlogging increased, but salinity decreased, the amounts of water-dispersible clay in the soils of low EC value. The higher salinity level can counteract the adverse effect of waterlogging on clay flocculation.
ACCESSION #
15043265

 

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