TITLE

Navy Eyes $1 Billion Support Ships To Supply Carrier Strike Groups

AUTHOR(S)
Burgess, Richard R.
PUB. DATE
October 2004
SOURCE
Sea Power;Oct2004, Vol. 47 Issue 10, p24
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the U.S. Navy policy related to combat support ships. The U.S. Navy has begun studying operational alternatives for a new class of fast combat support ships (T-AOEs) to keep its carrier strike groups resupplied at set. The ships will be designed as a sea-basing asset and to sustain the combat effectiveness of the next-generation aircraft carrier. Unlike the slower supply ships of the Military Sealift Command, which shuffle supplies from shore stations to ships, an AOE normally steams in company with a battle group, and therefore must be capable of speeds of 26 knots or more. INSET: The Replenishment Fleet.
ACCESSION #
14893234

 

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