TITLE

Why Labor Is in Politics

AUTHOR(S)
Cooke, Morris Llewellyn
PUB. DATE
October 1944
SOURCE
New Republic;10/9/44, Vol. 111 Issue 15, p454
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the political participation of the labor movement in United States politics. Factual background on the emergence of the labor movement in the country; Efforts of every workers' union in the world in demanding for legitimate recognition, respect and recovery from abject poverty brought by the Industrial Revolution; Recognition for production as the driving force of industry.
ACCESSION #
14796859

 

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