TITLE

CZECHS AND SLOVAKS SINCE MUNICH

AUTHOR(S)
Hanč, Jozef
PUB. DATE
October 1939
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Oct39, Vol. 18 Issue 1, p102
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article examines how the Czecho-Slovak Republic left by the Munich settlement of September 29, 1938 was destined to be short-lived. After Munich, a government was formed at Prague under the leadership of Rudolph Beran, the Germanophile head of the dominant Agrarian Party. All anti-Nazi tendencies were suppressed and the Third Reich was given permission to build a highway through the heart of the country. Yet the more the government of Czecho-Slovakia strove to accommodate itself to the situation, the more it became clear that Germany intended to impose a more integral solution. Examples are given of how the Nazi domination actually works. The Czechs and Slovaks cannot count on more than academic sympathy from abroad. While awaiting the hour of national freedom, the Czech people takes solace in its tradition of democratic self-discipline and finds protection in the imperviousness of its national spirit to foreign doctrines.
ACCESSION #
14772676

 

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