TITLE

The Men Who Make the Future

AUTHOR(S)
Bliven, Bruce
PUB. DATE
November 1940
SOURCE
New Republic;11/18/40, Vol. 103 Issue 21, p681
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents views of several scientists on various issues related to the social aspects of science and technology. Optimism expressed by scientists about a bright coexistence of science and society; Belief expressed by scientists in democracy as the only possible way of life; Reasons why these scientists do not fear that mankind is destroying irreplaceable raw materials and will some day suffer drastically from this; New developments which have sustained the interests of these scientists.
ACCESSION #
14750620

 

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