TITLE

What Went Wrong?

AUTHOR(S)
Lowry, Richard
PUB. DATE
October 2004
SOURCE
National Review;10/25/2004, Vol. 56 Issue 20, p34
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Considers the miscalculations and missteps that led to the current situation in Iraq. Suggestion that the claims that there was no post-war planning and that the Pentagon ignored the advice of military commanders to provide more troops have been created by liberal journalists; Reference to the fact that the Pentagon favored the creation of an Iraqi government and the training of indigenous Iraqi forces; Purposes of a quick and light mobile force, including collapsing the regime of Saddam Hussein as quickly as possible and taking the oilfields; Evidence that there was a strong element of surprise when the American troops entered Iraq; Impact of an excess of humanitarianism on the invasion plan; Impact of the need for more security that anticipated on executing much of the planning that was in place.
ACCESSION #
14738164

 

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