TITLE

Three Strikes, You're Responsible!

AUTHOR(S)
Ludeman, Kate; Erlandson, Eddie
PUB. DATE
December 2003
SOURCE
Click (1532-0391);Dec2003, p11
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In this article the author presents his views on the use of the rule of threes strikes in monitoring a person's commitment to responsibility. As long as no one takes responsibility for an issue, the situation or problem will return again and again. Use the rule of three to no longer be on the receiving end of "out there" thinking. This is not easy. One can be tripped up reaching for home base and find oneself back on the bench. According to the author one should be accountable for his or he emotions. When one is feeling angry, sad or fearful, he should ask himself how he can choose ease and confidence instead.
ACCESSION #
14727563

 

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