TITLE

EDUCATION AND THE NATIONAL INTEREST

AUTHOR(S)
Wriston, Henry M.
PUB. DATE
July 1957
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Jul57, Vol. 35 Issue 4, p564
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on various issues in the U.S. that enliven in the context of education and its role in national interest. One such is the cold war, now a decade old; many feel that education should take its direction from this central international reality. They believe the national interest is so deeply involved that it should be the dominant factor in determining the content and emphasis of our educational system. On this assumption, there is an eager demand to know whether they are turning out enough, and adequately trained, experts in a wide range of skills essential to success in the cold war. The varieties of expertness required for international effectiveness are many: legal, economic, political, linguistic, scientific, engineering, cultural and communication skills are all in demand. From the point of view of the national interest, all these seem to critics to be in very short supply. There are equal, and sometimes greater, doubts about another fundamental: the adequacy and quality of general education for international affairs. The Bachelors of Arts and Sciences are ready to meet the citizen's obligation and participate effectively in shaping public opinion on world questions. The most common measure of adequacy currently employed is the relationship between our educational product and that of the Soviets.
ACCESSION #
14723247

 

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