TITLE

BRITISH DEFENSE POLICY

AUTHOR(S)
Slessor, John
PUB. DATE
July 1957
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Jul57, Vol. 35 Issue 4, p551
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the British White Paper on Defense that has been described as a momentous shift in policy, a radical change in strategic concept, an "agonizing reappraisal." For this the wording of the Paper may itself be partly responsible, with its talk about a revision of the whole character of the Defense plan and the biggest change in military policy ever made in normal times. So perhaps the first thing that should be said about the White Paper is that in fact it is no such thing. It introduces no basic revolution in policy, but merely rationalizes and probably for the first time explains in admirably intelligible form tendencies, which have long been obvious and policies most of which successive British governments have accepted and urged upon their Allies for some years. But the White Paper emphasizes that the conception of collective defense is the basis of all our alliances. The days of gunboat diplomacy are gone forever. But unfortunately in the world one lives in all diplomacy is powerless if it is clear to everyone that force will never be used in any circumstances to right a wrong, even after every resource of economic, and political pressure has been exhausted, except possibly with the approval of the United Nations in the event of open invasion across a frontier by an unmistakably Communist army.
ACCESSION #
14723223

 

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