TITLE

GOALS AND MEANS OF THE WESTERN ALLIANCE

AUTHOR(S)
Brentano, Heinrich von
PUB. DATE
April 1961
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Apr61, Vol. 39 Issue 3, p416
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the message of U.S. President John F. Kennedy to the Congress related to concern about the situation of the Western Alliance, particularly North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). He refrained from outlining the familiar facts about the origin and development of NATO. He believed that, with the creation of NATO, the Soviet Union failed in its effort to spread communism in Europe. He believed that the attitude of the Soviet Union towards the German government would be an index of its assessment of the solidarity and capacity for resistance of the Western world. He stated that the one-sided picture of NATO as a military defense alliance also contains the danger that the military authorities and their purely military demands may gain a predominant influence on politics. And this touches the very core of the Western world. He emphasized that an alliance such as NATO is not only confined solely to the military sector but also to the more passive work of organizing defense shield against aggression.
ACCESSION #
14719860

 

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