TITLE

REVISING THE JAPANESE CONSTITUTION

AUTHOR(S)
Quigley, Harold S.
PUB. DATE
October 1959
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Oct59, Vol. 38 Issue 1, p140
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on Japanese constitution. Japan's phenomenal economic progress within the past decade would seem to assure a comparatively smooth political future. Yet there are those who match the prophets of a shift to the left with one to the right. One may not, therefore, ignore the proposals of a committee of the old Liberal Party, the Jiyuto, made in 1954. They would come close to restoring the Meiji Constitution. They would remove the constitutional safeguard of human rights, put back the power to issue ordinances on a par with the legislative power, authorize the Cabinet not only to dissolve the House of Representatives but to suspend the Diet, and revive the myth of imperial rule. War would be renounced in the preamble, but a military organization would be part of the governmental structure. While these proposals recall the thinking of dominant prewar oligarchs, they ignore both the growth of liberalism that had taken place before the war-exhibited in official circles by some courageous leaders, intellectual and moderate-labor spokesmen who compose a capable, vigorous and fearless alliance against the return of "behind-the-curtain" government.
ACCESSION #
14719590

 

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