TITLE

SOVIET INTERVENTION IN THE WAR WITH JAPAN

AUTHOR(S)
Morton, Louis
PUB. DATE
July 1962
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Jul62, Vol. 40 Issue 4, p653
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article discusses the role of the Soviet Union in the struggle against Japan. The Russo-Japanese Neutrality Pact of April 1941 proved a boon for both countries. It encouraged Japan in its plans for southern expansion by assuring Soviet neutrality in case of war with the United States, and it gave Russia similar assurances in the event of a German attack. As George Kennan remarked, the two countries "--one being confronted with great opportunities, the other with great dangers--agreed for the moment on a moratorium in the rivalry over East Asia." Two months after the Pact was signed, Hitler loosed the full fury of the Nazi war machine against his former ally. The Japanese, when the Germans struck, kept their side of the bargain. And when they in turn attacked the United States in December, the Russians kept theirs. Whatever the reasons, at least each made good on his pledge to the other. Once the United States was in the war, many Americans assumed that the Soviet Union, in common with England and the Associated Powers, would now fight shoulder to shoulder with her Allies against the enemy in Asia as well as in Europe. Notice of this possibility was taken in the press, and on the day after the attack. President Roosevelt and Secretary of State Cordell Hull raised the question with Maxim Litvinov, the Soviet Ambassador.
ACCESSION #
14719280

 

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