TITLE

BALANCE SHEET ON DISARMAMENT

AUTHOR(S)
McCloy, John J.
PUB. DATE
April 1962
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Apr1962, Vol. 40 Issue 3, p339
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article presents information on disarmament. There was undoubtedly an accumulation of factors during the past year and at the beginning of the current year which must be classed as negative. Most of these relate to the test-ban negotiations. Indeed, the most discouraging setback was the Soviet Union's abrupt resumption of testing of nuclear and thermonuclear devices on a massive scale at a time when the United States was earnestly striving for an agreement. The persistent determination shown by U.S. President John F. Kennedy to find an acceptable basis at Geneva for a ban on testing created an atmosphere in which an agreement seemed possible of accomplishment. Prior to the reconvening of negotiations at Geneva in March of 1961, it was believed that the Soviet Union, in spite of its almost pathological abhorrence of any system of thorough inspection did sincerely wish to reach an agreement, even though this involved a substantial system of controls. That belief was sharply modified when the Soviets introduced the "troika" concept into the negotiations, since that would have made the inspection provisions subject to a Soviet veto and thus completely illusory. The belief was further impaired during the summer when Arthur Dean, the United States representative, made a series of substantive proposals studiously designed to meet many of the stated Soviet objections, only to have them rejected out of hand. And it was practically destroyed on September 2, 1961, the date of the resumption of Soviet testing. As one looks back, it appears that the radical reversals of Soviet positions during the course of these Negotiations were induced by the insistent pressure of the United States and Great Britain for the conclusion of a treaty.
ACCESSION #
14718680

 

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