TITLE

Who Caused the Aluminum Shortage?

AUTHOR(S)
Straight, Michael
PUB. DATE
May 1941
SOURCE
New Republic;5/26/41, Vol. 104 Issue 21, p723
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents information on investigations of the U.S. Senate Committee under the leadership of Senator Harry S. Truman, regarding the shortage of aluminum and the part played in this shortage by Aluminum Co. of America (Alcoa). Failure of the company to respond to defense needs; Details about the testimony of William L. Batt, deputy director of the Office of Production Management, admitting the aluminum shortage; Information on the testimony of Richard Reynolds, president of an independent company, in which he testified that he had warned Alcoa of aluminum shortage; Steps taken by Alcoa to prevent Reynolds from getting his loan passed for constructing a new plant; Discussion of the threat to the monopoly of Alcoa in 1939; Information about an industrial project at Fontana, which is an evidence of Alcoa's unwillingness to cooperate in defense.
ACCESSION #
14707604

 

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