TITLE

War Poetry Then and Now

AUTHOR(S)
Deutsch, Babette
PUB. DATE
April 1941
SOURCE
New Republic;4/21/41, Vol. 104 Issue 16, p565
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the war poetry of 1914 and 1941. Differences in the attitudes of the poets of the two period; View that it was before poet Rupert Brooke had had any experience of war that he glorified it in verse; Pity as a recurrent note in the war poems of Wilfred Wilson Gibson; Literary style of poets; Report that the verses of poets, even when it deals with more private matters, abounds in the imagery of modern warfare; View that the poets of 1941 have seen violence undreamed of by the men of 1914; View that the poets of 1941, unlike their predecessors, understand that the war is no joyous adventure, no crusade, but a dirty job, and that the winning of the war may be less difficult than the winning of the peace; Statement that the poets can speak only out of their bewilderment and pain, unless and until the war aims are declared, and proved to answer the needs of the common man and the desires of the just.
ACCESSION #
14706801

 

Related Articles

  • I. PEACE. BROOKE, RUPERT // 1914 & Other Poems;1/1/1915, p4 

    The poem "Peace," by Rupert Brooke is presented. First Line: Now, God be thanked Who has matched us with His hour, Last Line: And the worst but Death.

  • Peace. Brooke, Rupert // Collected Poems of Rupert Brooke;1/1/1920, p41 

    Presents the poem "Peace," by Rupert Brooke. First Line: Now, God be thanked Who has matched us with His hour, Last Line: And the worst friend and enemy is but Death.

  • RUPERT BROOKE. Brooke, Rupert // 1914 & Other Poems;1/1/1915, p1 

    The article presents a brief snapshot of the life of poet Rupert Brooke.

  • THE GEORGIAN POETS IN DYMOCK. Whittington-Egan, Richard // Contemporary Review;Mar2001, Vol. 278 Issue 1622, p169 

    Features Georgian poets who spent a summer in the village of Dymock, Gloucestershire, England in 1914. Lascelles Abercrombie; Wilfrid Wilson Gibson; Robert Frost.

  • GIBSON, WILFRID WILSON. Mellown, Elgin W. // Descriptive Catalogue of the Bibliographies of the Twentieth-Cen;1978, p128 

    A list of primary and general bibliographic references for British writer Wilfrid Wilson Gibson from the book "A Descriptive Catalogue of the Bibliographies of Twentieth-Century British Poets, Novelists, and Dramatists" is presented.

  • 1914: I. Peace. Brooke, Rupert // Collected Classic Poems, Abercrombie to Clough;2012, p1 

    The poem "1914: I: Peace" by Rupert Brooke is presented. First Line: Now, God be thanked Who has matched us with His hour, Last Line: And the worst friend and enemy is but Death.

  • A Letter to a Live Poet. Brooke, Rupert // Collected Poems of Rupert Brooke;1/1/1920, p62 

    Presents the poem "A Letter to a Live Poet," by Rupert Brooke. First Line: Sir, since the last Elizabethan died, Last Line: The thunder of the trumpets of the noun!

  • Rupert Brooke. Wickham, Anna // Modern British Poetry;1/1/1920, p213 

    A biography of poet Rupert Brooke born in Rugby, England in August 1887,is presented. It states that Brooke became interested in all forms of sports during his younger age including cricket, tennis and swimming. It mentions that Brooke was considered as one of the handsomest Englishmen of his...

  • Rupert Brooke The Young Lion in America. KINSEY, SALLY BUCHANAN // Nineteenth Century;Spring2009, Vol. 29 Issue 1, p46 

    A biography of Romantic English poet Rupert Brooke is presented. He was born in Warwickshire, England and studied at King's College in Cambridge. After recovering from a nervous breakdown during his departure for America, he was financially supported by the Westminster Gazette in London in...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics