TITLE

The Folklore of Thurman Arnold

AUTHOR(S)
Strout, Richard Lee
PUB. DATE
April 1942
SOURCE
New Republic;4/27/42, Vol. 106 Issue 17, p570
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Role of Thomas Arnold as head of the Antitrust Division during the New Deal and into the politics of the New Deal itself. Reflection of a drive against anti-trust law enforcement in Arnold's speech and testimony; Effects of postponement of suits for war in several corporations; Statement that business, farmer and the consumer are all at the mercy of unions and organized labor which are destroying small business.
ACCESSION #
14692664

 

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